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Liver Health and Alcohol Dependency Treatment

liver health alcohol dependency

Liver health can be seriously affected by untreated alcohol dependency. In fact, alcohol-related liver disease can lead to serious conditions such fatty liver, alcohol-induced hepatitis, and even fatal cirrhosis. For those who have been dependent on alcohol for years, private inpatient alcohol dependency treatment can be the first step to restoring liver health and preventing liver conditions from worsening.

In fact, liver disease caused by alcohol dependence can lead to liver failure and liver cancer. If you’ve been dependent on alcohol for years, our private inpatient treatment center is the first step towards liver recovery.

Here are some of the other benefits of professional alcoholism treatment:

  • You’ll learn how to control your drinking so that it doesn’t interfere with your daily life or relationships. This will help you avoid relapse and live healthier overall.
  • You’ll gain coping skills to deal with stress without turning back to drinking as a solution.

These tools will also help you stay sober when temptation strikes again in the future because they’re not just effective while you’re in rehabilitation, but long after you’ve completed treatment. Inpatient alcohol dependency treatment can be the first step to restoring liver health and preventing liver conditions from worsening. So if you’re struggling with alcohol-related liver disease, don’t hesitate to seek professional help. You’ll be able to get your life back on track and restore your liver health in the process.

Understanding the Function of the Liver

The liver is one of the most exceptional organs in the human body. Primarily functioning to remove toxins from the bloodstream, the liver performs a host of important tasks for overall health. From storing vitamins to creating necessary proteins from amino acids, the liver also gives your body the energy and strength it needs to survive. Additionally, the liver processes complex fats, metabolizes and stores the body’s sugars for energy, and creates important cholesterols.

The liver is one of the most important organs in the body. It performs many vital functions, including detoxifying the blood, breaking down fats and proteins, and storing energy.

Alcohol dependence can take a serious toll on the liver. Heavy drinking can damage liver cells and interfere with their ability to function properly. This can lead to liver cirrhosis, a serious condition that can be fatal.

Fortunately, alcohol dependence can be treated successfully. Treatment usually includes counseling and/or medication, and it often leads to long-term sobriety. By getting help for alcohol dependence, you can protect your liver and improve your overall health.

How Alcohol Affects Liver Health

Alcohol is essentially a toxin, and the liver processes alcohol when it enters the body. In fact, the liver breaks down alcohol, ensuring that they do not create toxic conditions in the bloodstream. As alcohol consumption becomes prolonged, the liver cannot properly process these toxins. Steatosis (also known as “fatty liver”) can set in when the liver loses this ability to process alcohol. Fat deposits accumulate within the liver, causing dangerous scar tissue or cysts.

If alcohol consumption continues once steatosis has set in, the liver becomes inflamed. Alcohol-dependent individuals may experience symptoms such as fatigue, jaundice, cognitive difficulties, or even fluid in the abdomen. If treatment is not sought, alcohol-dependent individuals may even develop a condition known as cirrhosis—a perpetual state of liver disease that causes the compromise of healthy tissue and an overabundance of scar tissue. Cirrhosis is currently considered by most medical experts to be irreversible and can lead to death if untreated.

Treating Liver Conditions at Inpatient Alcohol Rehab Centers

When you can finally cure alcohol addiction, the damage to the liver no longer progresses. In fact, conditions of fatty liver and alcohol-induced hepatitis can usually be treated by medical staff, sometimes including the administration of corticosteroids. Inpatient alcohol rehab centers can ensure that you receive the proper diagnostic tests, medications, or nutritional guidance in order to help your liver—and the rest of your body—make a full recovery. Even if you have been diagnosed with cirrhosis, finding freedom from alcoholism will likely improve both the quantity—and certainly the quality—of your life.

If you’re struggling with alcohol-related liver disease, don’t hesitate to seek professional help. Treatment usually includes counseling and/or medication, and it often leads to long-term sobriety. By getting help for alcohol dependence, you can protect your liver and improve your overall health.

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