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Drug Withdrawal Signs and Symptoms

Frequent and chronic use of dangerous drugs (e.g., cocaine, heroin) typically leads to a much more severe disorder—drug addiction. Addiction or substance use disorder is a physical and psychological condition characterized by one’s inability to control the use of drugs, no matter the consequences.

As a result of addiction and long-term use, the body gradually develops a physical dependence on the harmful drug. So when you abruptly stop consuming addictive drugs, your body can experience several adverse effects from drug withdrawal.

Learn more about drug withdrawal, its signs and symptoms, and how drug rehab in San Fernando Valley can help you go through it safely. 

What is drug withdrawal?

Drug withdrawal refers to the process of discontinuing or reducing the intake of substance use. Once you cut back on drugs, your body will start to experience a variety of reactions called drug withdrawal symptoms.

Withdrawal symptoms happen due to the body’s acquired dependence on the specific drug. Since the body has been taught to function under the heavy influence of the illegal substance, over time, it will need the drug’s presence to exist in a stable condition. This stability becomes compromised when you suddenly take away the body’s drug of choice.

Withdrawal symptoms vary from person to person. Some may be life-threatening, while others may only experience mild to moderate symptoms. Additionally, drug withdrawal varies in severity and duration depending on a lot of factors, such as:

  • The type of drug used
  • The length of substance abuse
  • The drug’s potency and dosage
  • The current state of the patient’s health
  • Whether the patient undergoes self-detox or medically-assisted detox.

Drug withdrawal and detoxification play an important role in your journey towards getting clean and enjoying a healthy life. Fortunately, you don’t have to go through with it alone. You can get the medical and psychological support you need from the drug treatment center in Los Angeles.

What are the common signs and symptoms of drug withdrawal?

Substance abuse not only affects the physical body; it also affects one’s mental, cognitive, behavioral, and social well-being. The same goes for withdrawal. The body’s reaction to quitting these harmful drugs varies and may be categorized into different groups. Some examples of the most common symptoms of drug withdrawal include:

Physical

Physical symptoms are the actual manifestation of drug withdrawal, which can be seen by the naked eye or felt by the patient. Some examples of withdrawal symptoms that are consistent with almost all kinds of drug substances include:

  • Fatigue and lethargy
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea
  • Dehydration
  • Sweating, shakiness, and body tremors
  • Clammy skin
  • Tingling feeling on the skin
  • Muscle pain, cramps, and tension
  • Runny nose
  • Congestion
  • Increased appetite
  • Hot and cold flushes
  • Increased heart rate and blood pressure
  • Seizures for severe cases

Psychological and behavioral

Psychological symptoms refer to the effect of drug withdrawal on the patient’s mental well-being. It may also affect the way the patient thinks, behaves, and interacts with their surroundings during drug withdrawal. Some examples include:

  • Agitation and irritability
  • Sleeping problems or insomnia
  • Sudden mood changes
  • Nervousness
  • Restlessness
  • Hallucinations or sensory experiences that are only created by the mind. This includes seeing or hearing something that isn’t there.
  • Paranoia and delirium

The patient may also develop mental health issues, such as anxiety and depression during drug withdrawal. Unfortunately, this only worsens the psychological symptoms and makes withdrawal more difficult.

Cognitive

Cognitive symptoms are the effects of drug withdrawal on the patient’s brain and cognitive function. One of its most common cognitive effects is memory and concentration problems, which usually lead to confusion and disorientation. 

Moreover, drug abuse also impairs several cognitive abilities, so there’s no telling when normal brain function will return after withdrawal.

Where to seek treatment and support for drug withdrawal?

Drug withdrawal can be a scary and intimidating endeavor, with all the life-threatening symptoms that come with it. So, it’s vital to start the detoxification and withdrawal process in a safe and secure environment, such as a drug treatment center.

A drug detox or treatment center can help you overcome drug addiction by creating an individualized treatment plan to address your specific needs. They will also devise a plan of care during your detoxification process to avoid severe withdrawal symptoms. This may include the following:

  • Proper withdrawal management techniques
  • Counselling
  • Behavioral therapy
  • Psychiatric treatment
  • Psychoeducation
  • Aftercare plan

Withdrawal management programs do not end when your symptoms subside. It includes an aftercare treatment plan to give patients the right tools to manage their cravings and avoid relapse. It may also involve educating your loved ones so they can support you towards a full recovery.

Get the Support You Need at One of the Best Recovery Centers in Los Angeles County 

At NorthStar, we provide exceptional patient care and evidence-based treatment programs to ensure a safe, effective, and long-lasting recovery for our patients. Our trained doctors and licensed health professionals will guide you every step of the way using advanced therapeutic modalities. 

Our Tarzana recovery center treats all kinds of substance abuse, including the following:

Recovery is just a phone call away! Contact Us now to get in touch with our trusted clinical staff and start your journey towards a healthy recovery! 

alcohol addiction treatment tarzana

 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

The effects of detoxing from cocaine can be mild to severe, depending on how much and when you took it. Symptoms may include: restlessness; an increase in heart rate or blood pressure (depending upon the individual); difficulty sleeping due to the intense energy levels that are often present during this phase).

It's important not only to monitor one’s physical health but also mental state while undergoing withdrawal because both will rapidly deteriorate without treatment - which brings us back full circle!).

Cocaine is a strong, powerful drug that affects your mental health and physical well-being. The speed at which it enters the bloodstream makes cocaine withdrawals more intense than other drugs with longer half-lives such as crack or heroin; even though these substances will have less of an effect on you during withdrawal periods because their effects wear off quickly after use (depending upon how much time has passed since last consumption).

On average people experiencing any form can expect mild complications like increased heart rate while severe side effects could include convulsions near death.

Cocaine is a powerful, addictive stimulant. It produces an intense high that lasts anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour and when it's gone you are left wanting more which can lead to some psychological symptoms such as comedowns or anxiety during the withdrawal process called "withdrawal."

Symptoms of Cocaine Withdrawal

Cocaine detox can be a difficult process, but it isn't anywhere near the intensity of other drug withdrawals. Withdrawal from coke will bring on some mental health issues such as difficulty concentrating or thinking quickly; Hostility may arise because you're no longer seeking out any more drugs in order to feel better - just trying desperately at least once while experiencing these physical symptoms that seem insurmountable without their medication! Paranoia/suspiciousness is also common during this time period due to both psychological factors (like having bad thoughts) coupled with inconveniences like lackluster sleep patterns.

Treatments for Cocaine Addiction Detox

Medications: When a person is addicted to cocaine, they will often turn towards medication as an alternative way of dealing with their problem. There are no FDA-approved medications available on the market specifically designed for this purpose but some may help in stabilizing mood and reducing depression which can lead someone back from using drugs altogether!

Behavioral Therapy: The behavioral therapy treatments that focus on changing behavior can be done either as part of an outpatient program or during stays in hospitals for more severe cases. The cognitive-behavioral technique teaches ways to help you avoid using cocaine by making your thoughts and feelings about the substance so it doesn't trigger cravings anymore, among other things.

The goal of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is to help you avoid using cocaine. CBT treatments focus on the idea that our actions are shaped by thoughts and attitudes, so it's important not only for individuals who struggle with addiction but also people living life fully every day because we all have potential flaws in ourselves which could lead us down unhealthy paths if left unchecked

As part of an outpatient program, behavioral therapies change behaviors through techniques such as reward schedules or punishment circuitry; certain songs may be played when someone achieves certain milestones-- rewards can include toys while naughty behavior deserves no treats!

Rewards: When you do not use drugs, there are many positive benefits. One way to get these rewards is by being rewarded for your good behavior with something that's important or means more than just money- like approval from family members who care about how things go in our lives! This can help teach us valuable skills such as building self-esteem and learning when it might be appropriate/safe enough not only to pause but also stop using any kind of illegal substances altogether if needed.

 

 

If you have a friend or family member who lives with an addiction, it’s only natural to think of how you can help. While it may not always be easy, providing your loved ones with the help they need to fight their addiction will give them a better chance of overcoming it. In this blog post, we discuss everything you need to know about drug and alcohol abuse, how codependency may affect relationships, and where to find help to combat addiction. 

Things to Do

Here are a few things you can put into practice when trying to help out a loved one cope and overcome their substance or alcohol addiction: 

Build Trust 

Start by building trust with them so that they’re more likely to listen to you. But if your loved one has already broken your trust before, it can take a while to establish it again. Keep in mind, however, that establishing trust is an important step towards helping them to change. 

  • Be honest by letting them know how their addiction has affected your relationship and life with them 
  • Stay supportive but respect their privacy — while you can’t force them to quit, you can be their source of strength 
  • Avoid actions that destroy trust such as: criticizing, nagging, lecturing, yelling, exaggerating, and name-calling. 
  • Engaging in substance abuse yourself

Expect Difficulties

Various reasons make it difficult for a loved one to quit their addiction. They may: 

  • Not be willing to change their habits 
  • Not think that they have a problem 
  • Feel embarrassed and be unwilling to discuss their addiction 
  • Not fear consequences such as going to prison or losing their job 
  • Feel awkward discussing their issues with a professional such as a counselor or doctor 
  • Be engaging in their addiction to avoid having to deal with other problems such as finances or a mental illness 

Unfortunately, there’s no way to instantly help someone with an addiction, and overcoming it takes a lot of support and effort. If a person doesn’t want to help themself by changing their behavior, then trying to convince them is unlikely to work. 

Things Not to Do

There are certain things that you’ll need to avoid doing to encourage the healthy recovery of your loved one:

  • Don’t threaten your loved ones by giving them an ultimatum, as this may cause them to hide their behavior 
  • Expect them to change immediately because recovery takes time and setbacks are likely to happen 
  • Don’t criticize your loved one as this may add to their shame and make them doubt their ability to quit 
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